Tazarotene

Name: Tazarotene

Tazarotene Overview

Tazarotene is a prescription medication used to treat acne, fine lines and to reduce the appearance of wrinkles, spots on the skin, and psoriasis. Tazarotene belongs to a group of drugs called retinoids, but the way tazarotene works is not known.

This medication comes in gel, foam, and cream forms and is applied to the affected skin once a day in the evening.

Common side effects of tazarotene include itching, burning or stinging, and redness of the skin.

 

Tazarotene Brand Names

Tazarotene may be found in some form under the following brand names:

  • Avage

  • Fabior

  • Tazorac

Uses for Tazarotene

Psoriasis

Treatment of stable plaque psoriasis with ≤20% body surface area involvement.1 3 4 16 19

Combination therapy with a mid-or high-potency topical corticosteroid more effective than either agent alone.21 22 23

0.1% cream or gel more effective in improving psoriasis manifestations;1 19 0.05% cream or gel associated with less local irritation.1 4 17 19

Acne

Treatment of mild to moderate acne vulgaris.1 6 7 19

Efficacy in patients resistant to oral antibiotics or previously treated with other retinoids not established.1

Photoaging

Palliative therapy to improve dermatologic changes (e.g., fine wrinkling, mottled hypo- or hyperpigmentation, benign lentigines) associated with photodamage.27

Use as an adjunct to a comprehensive skin care plan and sun avoidance program.27 (See Administration under Dosage and Administration.)

Does not eliminate or prevent wrinkles, repair photodamaged skin, reverse photoaging, or restore youthful or younger dermal histologic pattern.27 No mitigating effects on severe manifestations of chronic sunlight exposure (e.g., coarse/deep wrinkling, tactile roughness, telangiectasia, skin laxity, keratinocytic atypia, melanocytic atypia, dermal elastosis) demonstrated.27

Safety and efficacy not established for use in nonwhite (e.g., Asian, Hispanic) patients or Fitzpatrick skin types V and VI.27

Brand Names U.S.

  • Avage
  • Fabior
  • Tazorac

Duration of Action

Therapeutic: Psoriasis: Effects have been observed for up to 3 months after a 3-month course of topical treatment

Half-Life Elimination

Cream, gel: ~81 hours (tazarotenic acid); Foam: 8.1 ± 3.7 hours

Protein Binding

>99% (tazarotenic acid)

Dosing Renal Impairment

There are no dosage adjustments provided in the manufacturer’s labeling.

Precautions

Tazarotene topical is contraindicated in women who are or may become pregnant. If this drug is used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, treatment should be discontinued and the possible risk to the fetus should be discussed with the patient. Women of childbearing potential should be warned of the potential risk and use adequate birth control measures when tazarotene topical is used. A negative pregnancy test should be obtained within 2 weeks prior to therapy, which should begin during a normal menstrual period.

Tazarotene topical is for external use on affected areas only. For tazarotene topical gel and cream [marketed as Tazorac(R)], contact with eyes, eyelids, and mouth should be avoided. For tazarotene topical cream [marketed as Avage(R)], contact with eyes and mouth should be avoided. For tazarotene topical foam, contact with the mouth, eyes, and mucous membranes should be avoided. Accidental contact should be rinsed well with water.

Tazarotene topical cream and gel may cause excessive irritation in the skin of sensitive individuals. In some cases it may be necessary to temporarily discontinue therapy, lower the concentration (in patients with psoriasis), or reduce the dosing to an interval the patient can tolerate. Therapy can be resumed or the drug concentration or application frequency can be increased as the patient is able to tolerate the treatment. Application frequency should be closely monitored by careful observation of the clinical therapeutic response and skin tolerance. Efficacy has not been established for less than once daily dosing frequencies.

If undue irritation (redness, peeling, or discomfort) occurs with tazarotene topical foam, patients should reduce frequency of application or temporarily interrupt treatment. Treatment may be resumed once irritation subsides. Treatment should be discontinued if irritation persists.

Concomitant topical acne therapy should be used with caution as a cumulative irritant effect may occur. If irritancy or dermatitis occurs, the application frequency should be reduced or treatment should be temporarily interrupted and resumed once the irritation subsides. Treatment should be discontinued if the irritation persists.

Safety of tazarotene topical gel has not been established when applied to over 20% of the body surface area.

Due to increased susceptibility to burning, exposure to sunlight (including sunlamps) should be avoided unless deemed medically necessary; in such cases, exposure should be minimized during use of tazarotene topical. Patients must be warned to use sunscreens (minimum SPF of 15) and protective clothing when using tazarotene topical. Patients with sunburn should be advised not to use tazarotene topical until fully recovered. Patients who may have considerable sun exposure due to their occupation and those patients with inherent sensitivity to sunlight should exercise particular caution.

Tazarotene topical should be used with caution in patients also taking drugs known to be photosensitizers due to the increased possibility of augmented photosensitivity.

Due to the potential for photosensitivity resulting in greater risk for sunburn, tazarotene topical foam should be used with caution in patients with a personal or family history of skin cancer.

Avage(R) topical cream should be used under medical supervision as an adjunct to a comprehensive skin care and sunlight avoidance program that includes the use of effective sunscreens (minimum SPF of 15) and protective clothing. The duration of the mitigating effects on facial fine wrinkling, mottled hypo- and hyperpigmentation, and benign facial lentigines following discontinuation of Avage(R) topical cream has not been studied.

Some facial pigmented lesions may be lentigo maligna instead of lentigines. Facial pigmented lesions of concern should be carefully assessed by a qualified physician before application of Avage(R) topical cream. Lentigo maligna should not be treated with Avage(R) topical cream.

Safety and effectiveness of Avage(R) topical cream have not been established for the prevention or treatment of actinic keratoses, skin neoplasms, or lentigo maligna. Safety and effectiveness of Avage(R) topical cream have not been established for daily use beyond 52 weeks.

Safety and effectiveness for the treatment of acne have not been established in pediatric patients less than 12 years of age. Safety and effectiveness for the treatment of psoriasis have not been established in pediatric patients (less than 18 years of age). Safety and effectiveness of tazarotene topical cream have not been established in pediatric patients less than 17 years of age with facial fine wrinkling, facial mottled hypo- and hyperpigmentation, and benign facial lentigines.

Dialysis

Data not available

(web3)