Q-Profen

Name: Q-Profen

Q-Profen Overview

Ibuprofen is both an over-the-counter and a prescription medication. The over-the-counter form is used both to treat minor aches and pains and also to reduce fever. The prescription form is used for the relief of signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, mild to moderate pain, and to treat primary dysmenorrhea. It may also be used to reduce fever in adults. This medication page refers to the prescription form of ibuprofen.

This medication comes in tablet and oral suspension forms. Ibuprofen may be given up to 6 times per day with food or milk to avoid stomach irritation.

This medication is available in an injectable form to be given directly into a vein (IV) by a healthcare professional.

Common side effects of ibuprofen include nausea, heartburn, diarrhea, stomach irritation, or headache. Ibuprofen can also cause dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how this medication will affect you.

Q-Profen Precautions

Serious side effects have been reported with ibuprofen including:

  • Heart attack or stroke: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms of...
    • shortness of breath
    • chest pain
    • weakness
    • slurring of speech
  • Hypertension: new hypertension or worsening of preexisting hypertension
    • Have your blood pressure monitored by your doctor closely if taking ibuprofen, especially if you have a history of hypertension or are taking medications to treat hypertension
  • Congestive heart failure (CHF): Tell your doctor if you...
    • have or have had CHF diagnosed in the past
    • note signs of CHF, such as swelling in the arms or legs, shortness of breath, unexplained weight gain, or fatigue
  • Serious and sometimes fatal skin reaction: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms of...
    • rash
    • blistering
    • itching
    • fever
  • Stomach bleeding, and/or ulceration: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms of...
    • pain
    • blood in stools (black or tarry stools)
    • coughing up of blood
    • indigestion or general stomach discomfort
  • Liver toxicity: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following...
    • flu-like symptoms
    • fatigue
    • nausea
    • yellow tinting of the skin or eyes
  • Kidney injury: Patients at greatest risk of this reaction include those with preexisting renal dysfunction, heart failure,liver injury, those taking diuretics or ACE inhibitors, and the elderly. Ibuprofen is not recommended in these patients with advanced renal disease.
  • Anaphylactoid reaction: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms...
    • swelling of the face or throat
    • difficulty of breathing
  • Changes in vision: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms...
    • blurred or decreased vision
    • changes in color vision
    • dark or gray spots in field of vision
  • Pregnancy: In late pregnancy, ibuprofen should be avoided since it may cause premature closure of the ductus arteriosus.

Do not take ibuprofen if the following has occurred:

  • an allergic reaction to ibuprofen
  • asthma, hives, or other allergic-type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs
  • coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery; ibuprofen is not to be used for treating pain before or after this surgery

Ibuprofen can cause dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Ibuprofen affects you.

Q-Profen Food Interactions

Medicines can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of ibuprofen, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving ibuprofen.

 

Inform MD

Before taking ibuprofen, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions. Especially tell your doctor if you:

  • have kidney problems
  • have liver problems
  • have heart problems
  • have had a stomach bleed or ulcer (hole in the lining of the stomach) in the past
  • have asthma
  • are pregnant or breastfeeding

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Q-Profen Usage

Take ibuprofen exactly as prescribed. Ibuprofen may be taken several times per day, depending on reason for use.

Shake oral suspension ibuprofen before use. May take ibuprofen with food or milk to prevent stomach irritation.

Do not exceed 3.2 grams (3200 mg) per day.

This medication is available in an injectable form to be given directly into a vein (IV) by a healthcare professional.

If you miss a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the regular time. Do not take two doses of ibuprofen at the same time unless instructed by your doctor.

Other Requirements

Store ibuprofen at room temperature.

Keep this and all medicines out of the reach of children.

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

  • Addaprin
  • Advil
  • A-G Profen
  • Bufen
  • Genpril
  • Haltran
  • Ibu
  • Ibu-2
  • Ibu-200
  • Ibu-4
  • Ibu-6
  • Ibu-8
  • Ibuprohm
  • Ibu-Tab
  • I-Prin
  • Midol
  • Motrin
  • Nuprin
  • Proprinal
  • Q-Profen

In Canada

  • Actiprofen
  • Advil Children's
  • Advil Pediatric
  • Children's Motrin
  • Children's Motrin Berry Flavor
  • Children's Motrin Bubble Gum Flavor
  • Children's Motrin Grape Flavor
  • Equate Children's Ibuprofen - Berry
  • Equate Children's Ibuprofen - Berry - Dye Free
  • Infants' Motrin
  • Option+ Children's Ibuprofen - Berry
  • Option+ Children's Ibuprofen - Grape

Available Dosage Forms:

  • Suspension
  • Tablet
  • Capsule, Liquid Filled
  • Tablet, Chewable
  • Capsule

Therapeutic Class: Analgesic

Pharmacologic Class: NSAID

Chemical Class: Propionic Acid (class)

Precautions While Using Q-Profen

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits. This will allow your doctor to see if the medicine is working properly and to decide if you should continue to take it. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects .

This medicine may raise your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. This is more likely in people who already have heart disease. People who use this medicine for a long time might also have a higher risk .

This medicine may cause bleeding in your stomach or intestines. These problems can happen without warning signs. This is more likely if you have had a stomach ulcer in the past, if you smoke or drink alcohol regularly, if you are over 60 years old, if you are in poor health, or if you are using certain other medicines (a steroid or a blood thinner) .

Serious skin reactions can occur during treatment with this medicine. Check with your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms while taking this medicine: blistering, peeling, loosening of skin, chills, cough, diarrhea, fever, itching, joint or muscle pain, red skin lesions, sore throat, sores, ulcers, white spots in mouth or on lips, or unusual tiredness or weakness .

Possible warning signs of some serious side effects that can occur during treatment with this medicine may include swelling of the face, fingers, feet, and/or lower legs; severe stomach pain, black, tarry stools, and/or vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds; unusual weight gain; yellow skin or eyes; decreased urination; bleeding or bruising; and/or skin rash. Also, signs of serious heart problems could occur such as chest pain, tightness in chest, fast or irregular heartbeat, unusual flushing or warmth of skin, weakness, or slurring of speech. Stop taking this medicine and check with your doctor immediately if you notice any of these warning signs .

This medicine may also cause a serious type of allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. Although this is rare, it may occur often in patients who are allergic to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Anaphylaxis requires immediate medical attention. The most serious signs of this reaction are very fast or irregular breathing, gasping for breath, wheezing, or fainting. Other signs may include changes in skin color of the face; very fast but irregular heartbeat or pulse; hive-like swellings on the skin; and puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes. If these effects occur, get emergency help at once .

Some people who have used this medicine had symptoms of meningitis. If you have fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, and stiff neck or back while using this medicine, check with your doctor right away .

Using this medicine while you are pregnant can harm your unborn baby. If you think you have become pregnant while using this medicine, tell your doctor right away .

Check with your doctor immediately if blurred vision, difficulty in reading, or any other change in vision occurs during or after your treatment. Your doctor may want you to have your eyes checked by an ophthalmologist (eye doctor) .

Before having any kind of surgery or medical tests, tell your doctor that you are taking this medicine. It may be necessary for you to stop treatment for a while, or to change to a different nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug before your procedure .

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to ibuprofen: compounding powder, intravenous solution, oral capsule, oral suspension, oral tablet, oral tablet chewable

General

The most frequently reported adverse effects were gastrointestinal (GI) in nature and included nausea, vomiting, flatulence, and diarrhea.

Patent Ductus Arteriosus: The most frequently reported adverse effects were sepsis, anemia, intraventricular bleeding, apnea, GI disorders, impaired renal function, respiratory infection, skin lesions, hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, and respiratory failure.[Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Very common (10% or more): Nausea (up to 57%), vomiting (up to 22%), flatulence (up to 16%), diarrhea (up to 10%)
Common (1% to 10%): Dyspepsia, abdominal discomfort, epigastric pain, heartburn, abdominal distress, indigestion, constipation, abdominal cramps/pain, fullness of GI tract, bloating, GI hemorrhage, melena
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Abdominal distention, dyspepsia, gastritis
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Peptic ulcer, perforation, hematemesis, mouth ulceration, exacerbation of colitis, exacerbation of Crohn's disease
Frequency not reported: Dry mouth, duodenitis, esophagitis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, GI bleeding, glossitis, rectal bleeding, stomatitis, eructation, gingival ulcer, pancreatitis

Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
Very common (10% or more): GI disorders non-necrotizing enterocolitis (22%)
Common (1% to 10%): Necrotizing enterocolitis, intestinal perforation
Frequency not reported: Abdominal distension, gastroesophageal reflux, gastritis, ileus, inguinal hernia
Postmarketing reports: GI perforation[Ref]

Cardiovascular

Very common (10% or more): Hemorrhage (up to 10%), hypertension (10%), hypotension (10%)
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Cardiac failure
Frequency not reported: Congestive heart failure, tachycardia, arrhythmia, myocardial infarction, palpitations, vasculitis, sinus bradycardia, angina pectoris, thrombotic events

Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
Frequency not reported: Tachycardia, cardiac failure, hypotension[Ref]

Nervous system

Very common (10% or more): Headache (up to 12%)
Common (1% to 10%): Dizziness, nervousness
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Cerebrovascular accident
Frequency not reported: Syncope, drowsiness, paresthesia, somnolence, tremors, convulsions, coma

Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
Common (1% to 10%): Intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular hemorrhage
Frequency not reported: Convulsions[Ref]

Renal

The number of total renal events in preterm infants within 30 days of therapy following IV use was 21% and included increased blood urea (7%), renal insufficiency/impairment (6%), reduced urine output (3%), increased blood creatinine (3%), renal failure (1%), and increased blood urea with hematuria (1%).[Ref]

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Acute renal failure, renal papillary necrosis, interstitial nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, renal failure, renal insufficiency
Frequency not reported: Cystitis, azotemia, creatinine clearance decreased, glomerulitis, tubular necrosis, nephrotoxicity

Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
Very common (10% or more): Renal events (21%)
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Acute renal failure[Ref]

Hematologic

The incidence of total bleeding events within 30 days of therapy with IV use in preterm infants was 32%. This percentage included grade 1 and 2 intraventricular hemorrhage (15%), grade 3 and 4 intraventricular hemorrhage (15%), and other bleeding (6%).[Ref]

Very common (10% or more): Anemia (up to 36%), eosinophilia (up to 26%), neutropenia (up to 13%), thrombocythemia (up to 10%)
Common (1% to 10%): Hemoglobin decreased
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, agranulocytosis, hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, hematocrit decreased
Frequency not reported: lymphadenopathy, bleeding episodes

Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
Very common (10% or more): Anemia (32%), total bleeding (32%), intraventricular hemorrhage (29%), Neutropenia, thrombocytopenia[Ref]

Dermatologic

Common (1% to 10%): Rash, maculopapular rash, pruritus
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Stevens-Johnson syndrome, erythema multiforme, toxic epidermal necrolysis
Frequency not reported: Ecchymosis, purpura, alopecia, sweating, photosensitivity, angioedema, exfoliative dermatitis, urticaria, vesiculobullous eruptions, Henoch Schonlein vasculitis

Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
Very common (10% or more): Skin lesion/irritation (16%)[Ref]

Metabolic

Very common (10% or more): Hypokalemia (up to 19%), hypoproteinemia (up to 13%), blood urea increased (10%), hypernatremia (10%), hypoalbuminemia (10%)
Common (1% to 10%): Appetite decreased, fluid retention
Frequency not reported: Appetite changes, hyperglycemia, hypoglycemic reaction, acidosis

Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
Very common (10% or more): Hypoglycemia (12%), hypocalcemia (12%), blood creatinine increased, blood sodium decreased
Common (1% to 10%): Hypernatremia
Frequency not reported: Feeding problems, hyperglycemia[Ref]

Other

Very common (10% or more): Bacteremia (13%), blood LDH increased (up to 10%)
Common (1% to 10%): Peripheral edema, wound hemorrhage, tinnitus, hearing impairment, edema, fatigue
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Aseptic meningitis, vertigo, exacerbation of infection-related inflammations
Frequency not reported: Fever, infection, sepsis, weight changes, asthenia, malaise, pseudo-tumor, hearing loss, drowsiness

Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
Very common (10% or more): Sepsis (43%)
Common (1% to 10%): Edema, fluid retention
Frequency not reported: Various infections[Ref]

Respiratory

Very common (10% or more): Bacterial pneumonia (up to 10%)
Common (1% to 10%): Cough
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Asthma, bronchospasm, dyspnea, wheezing
Frequency not reported: Apnea, respiratory depression, pneumonia, rhinitis, epistaxis

Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
Very common (10% or more): Apnea (28%), respiratory infection (19%), respiratory failure (10%), bronchopulmonary dysplasia
Common (1% to 10%): Atelectasis, pulmonary hemorrhage
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Hypoxemia
Postmarketing reports: Pulmonary hypertension[Ref]

Hepatic

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Hepatitis, jaundice
Frequency not reported: Hepatorenal syndrome, liver necrosis, liver failure, abnormal liver function tests

Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
Frequency not reported: Cholestasis, jaundice[Ref]

Hypersensitivity

Hypersensitivity reactions have been reported and may consist of any of the following: a syndrome of abdominal pain, fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, and anaphylaxis; respiratory tract reactivity comprising bronchospasm, asthma/aggravated asthma, or dyspnea; skin reactions, which rarely included exfoliative and bullous dermatoses, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, angioedema, pruritus, and urticaria.[Ref]

Frequency not reported: Anaphylactoid reactions, hypersensitivity reaction[Ref]

Ocular

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Visual disturbances
Frequency not reported: Blurred vision, amblyopia, diminished vision, scotomata, changes in color vision, conjunctivitis, dry eyes, diplopia, optic neuritis, cataracts, optic neuritis, toxic optic neuropathy[Ref]

Musculoskeletal

Frequency not reported: Lupus erythematosus syndrome[Ref]

Psychiatric

Frequency not reported: Anxiety, confusion, depression, dream abnormalities, insomnia, emotional lability, hallucinations[Ref]

Genitourinary

Common (1% to 10%): Urinary retention
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Proteinuria, hematuria
Frequency not reported: Dysuria, oliguria, polyuria, menorrhagia

Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
Very common (10% or more): Oliguria, hematuria
Common (1% to 10%): Urinary tract infection[Ref]

Immunologic

Frequency not reported: Serum sickness[Ref]

Local

Common (1% to 10%): Infusion site pain
Postmarketing reports: Transient sensation of burning in mouth/throat

Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
Frequency not reported: Injection site reactions[Ref]

Endocrine

Frequency not reported: Gynecomastia

Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
Common (1% to 10%): Adrenal insufficiency[Ref]

Some side effects of Q-Profen may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

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