Ovrette

Name: Ovrette

Other uses for this medicine

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What should I know about storage and disposal of this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org

Uses

This medication is used to prevent pregnancy. It is often referred to as the "mini-pill" because it does not contain any estrogen. Norgestrel (a form of progestin) is a hormone that prevents pregnancy by changing the womb and cervical mucus to make it more difficult for an egg to meet sperm (fertilization) or for the fertilized egg to attach to the wall of the womb (implantation). Regular use of the "mini-pill" prevents the release of an egg (ovulation) in about half of the women who use it.While the "mini-pill" is more effective than certain other methods of birth control (e.g., condoms, cervical cap, diaphragm), it is less effective than estrogen/progestin birth control because it does not consistently prevent ovulation. It is usually used by women who cannot take estrogen. For the most effective results, it is very important to take this medication exactly as prescribed.Using this medication does not protect you or your partner against sexually transmitted diseases (e.g., HIV, gonorrhea).OTHER This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.Norgestrel may also be used to help decrease pain and blood loss from a certain menstrual condition (heavy/painful periods due to endometriosis) and to help make your periods more regular.

How to use

Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this product and each time you get a refill. The leaflet contains very important information on when to take your pills and what to do if you miss a dose. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist.Take this medication by mouth with or without food, usually once daily or as directed by your doctor. For this medication to be effective, you must take it at the same time each day. Pick a time of day that is easy for you to remember, and take your pill at the same time each day. Missing a pill, taking it more than 3 hours late, or starting a new pack late will increase your risk of becoming pregnant. If you miss a pill or take this medication 3 or more hours later than usual, use a backup method of birth control (e.g., condom, spermicide) every time you have sex for the next 2 days.Taking this medication after your evening meal or at bedtime may help if you have any stomach upset or nausea with the medication. You may choose to take this medication at another time of day that is easier for you to remember. No matter what dosing schedule you use, it is very important that you take this medication at the same time each day, 24 hours apart. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.Continue taking one tablet every day. After taking the last tablet in your old pack, start a new pack the next day. There is no break between packs, and you do not take any "reminder" tablets (tablets without medication). Your periods may be early or late, shorter or longer, heavier or lighter than normal. You may also have some spotting between periods. Do not stop taking your pills if this happens.If you vomit within 4 hours after taking this medication or have diarrhea, use a back-up method of birth control (e.g., condoms, spermicide) every time you have sex for the next 2 days.If you continue to have regular menstrual periods while on this medication, you may be ovulating. This medication might still prevent pregnancy even if you are ovulating. Consult your doctor for more information, and ask about your risk of pregnancy and the possible use of other forms of birth control.If this is the first time you are using this medication and you are not switching from another form of hormonal birth control (e.g., patch, other birth control pills), take the first pill in the pack on the first day of your period. Use an additional form of birth control for the first 2 days if you are instructed to start this medication on any other day.Ask your doctor or pharmacist for information about how to switch from other forms of hormonal birth control (e.g., patch, other birth control pills) to this product. If any of this information is unclear, consult the Patient Information Leaflet or your doctor or pharmacist.

Drug interactions

Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for them. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first.This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sodium tetradecyl sulfate.If you are currently using the medication listed above, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting this medication.Before taking this medication, tell your doctor of all prescription and nonprescription medications you may use, especially of acitretin, drugs that speed up the movement of the gut (e.g., metoclopramide), isotretinoin, troleandomycin.Some drugs may cause hormonal birth control to work less well by decreasing the amount of birth control hormones in your body. This effect can result in pregnancy. Examples include griseofulvin, modafinil, rifamycins (such as rifampin, rifabutin), St. John's wort, drugs used to treat seizures (such as barbiturates, carbamazepine, felbamate, phenytoin, primidone, topiramate), HIV drugs (such as nelfinavir, nevirapine, ritonavir), among others.Tell your doctor when you start any new drug, and discuss if you should use additional reliable birth control. Also tell your doctor if you have any new spotting or breakthrough bleeding, because these may be signs that your birth control is not working well.This medication can affect the results of certain lab tests (e.g., sex-hormone-binding globulin, thyroid). Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this medication.This document does not contain all possible interactions. Therefore, before using this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the products you use. Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.

Dosing & Uses

No longer available in US

Contraception

0.075 mg PO qDay, at same time each day

Not applicable

Adverse Effects

>10%

Edema

Weakness

Anorexia

Amenorrhea

Breakthrough bleeding

Change in menstrual flow

Spotting

Frequency Not Defined

Deep vein thrombosis

Thrombophlebitis

Depression

Dizziness

Headache

Nervousness

Somnolence

Breast tenderness

Galactorrhea

Abdominal pain

Nausea

Vomiting

Change in weight

Cholestatic jaundice

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of medicines in this class. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Asthma or
  • Epilepsy (or history of) or
  • Heart or circulation problems or
  • Kidney disease (severe) or
  • Migraine headaches—Progestins may cause fluid retention which may cause these conditions to become worse.
  • Bleeding problems, undiagnosed, such as blood in the urine or changes in vaginal bleeding—May make diagnosis of these problems more difficult.
  • Blood clots, or history of or
  • Breast cancer, or history of or
  • Deep vein thrombosis (blood clot in the leg), active or history of or
  • Heart attack, active or history of or
  • Liver disease, including jaundice, or history of or
  • Pulmonary embolism (clot in the lung), active or history of or
  • Stroke , active or history of or
  • Venous thromboembolism (clot in the veins), or history of—Progestins should not be used in patients with these conditions.
  • Breast disease (such as breast lumps or cysts), history of—May make this condition worse for diseases that do not react in a positive way to progestins.
  • Diabetes mellitus—May cause an increase in your blood sugar and a change in the amount of medicine you take for diabetes; progestins in high doses are more likely to cause this problem.
  • Memory loss (dementia)—May make this condition worse.
  • Vision changes—This medicine may cause changes in vision; your medicine may need to be stopped if these conditions become worse.

Pediatric

Progestins have been used by teenagers and have not been shown to cause different side effects or problems than they do in adults. You must take progestin-only oral contraceptives every day in order for them to work. Progestins do not protect against sexually transmitted diseases, a risk factor for teenagers. It is not known if Depo-Provera Contraceptive Injection causes problems with bone development and growth in teenagers and young women. It is important that your doctor check you regularly for growth problems, especially if you have been using this medicine for 2 years or longer.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking any of these medicines, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using medicines in this class with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with a medication in this class or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Tranexamic Acid

Using medicines in this class with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Carbamazepine
  • Ceritinib
  • Dabrafenib
  • Darunavir
  • Eliglustat
  • Idelalisib
  • Isotretinoin
  • Lesinurad
  • Lixisenatide
  • Lumacaftor
  • Pitolisant
  • Sugammadex
  • Theophylline
  • Tizanidine
  • Ulipristal
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