Gentamicin Injection

Name: Gentamicin Injection

In case of emergency/overdose

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

Is gentamicin-injection available as a generic drug?

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

Do I need a prescription for gentamicin-injection?

Yes

What is the dosage for gentamicin-injection?

The dose of gentamicin is usually based on body weight. Total daily dose and duration of treatment depend on the condition or infection being treated. Dose adjustment is necessary for patients who have impaired kidney function. Doses are adjusted to target peak and trough levels.

  • Usual dosage ranges for IM or IV:
  • Conventional dosing: Administer 1 to 2.5 mg/kg/dose every 8-12 hours.
  • Once daily dosing: Administer 4 to 7 mg/kg/day.

Which drugs or supplements interact with gentamicin-injection?

Gentamicin may decrease the effectiveness of the BCG and typhoid vaccine.

Cephalosporins, amphotericin B (Amphocin), cisplatin (Platinol), colistimethate, cyclosporine (Sandimmune), loop diuretics, mannitol (Osmitrol), and vancomycin (Vancocin) may increase the risk of experiencing kidney related side effects of gentamicin.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) may decrease the kidney excretion or clearance of gentamicin. Examples of NSAIDs are:

  • ibuprofen (Motrin and others),
  • indomethacin (Indocin), and
  • naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve, and others).

Neuromuscular blocking agents may increase the risk of experiencing breathing problems by depressing the activity of respiratory muscles when given with gentamicin.

Loop diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix), bumetanide (Bumex), and torsemide (Demadex) may increase the ototoxicity (hearing impairment) associated with gentamicin treatment.

What else should I know about gentamicin-injection?

What preparations of gentamicin-injection are available?

Gentamicin sulfate solution for injection: 10, 40 mg/ml

How should I keep gentamicin-injection stored?

Gentamicin is usually given as an injection at the hospital, clinic, or doctor's office. Patient's using gentamicin solution at home should check with their healthcare provider on details regarding the proper storage of their medication.

gentamicin Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Incidence not known
  • Abdominal or stomach cramps or pain
  • agitation
  • back pain
  • black, tarry stools
  • blood in the urine
  • blurred or double vision
  • burning, numbness, tingling, or painful sensations
  • change in frequency of urination or amount of urine
  • chest pain
  • chills
  • coma
  • confusion
  • continuing ringing or buzzing or other unexplained noise in the ears
  • cough
  • difficult or troubled breathing
  • difficulty with swallowing
  • dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position
  • drowsiness
  • dry mouth
  • eye pain
  • fast heartbeat
  • fever with or without chills
  • hallucinations
  • headache
  • hearing loss
  • hives
  • hoarseness
  • increased thirst
  • irregular heartbeats
  • irregular, fast or slow, or shallow breathing
  • irritability
  • itching
  • joint pain
  • loss of appetite
  • mood or mental changes
  • muscle cramps in the hands, arms, feet, legs, or face
  • muscle pain or weakness
  • muscle spasms (tetany) or twitching
  • nausea or vomiting
  • nervousness
  • numbness and tingling around the mouth, fingertips, or feet
  • pale or blue lips, fingernails, or skin
  • pale skin
  • pinpoint red spots on the skin
  • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
  • right upper abdominal or stomach pain and fullness
  • seizures
  • sensation of spinning
  • skin rash
  • slow or fast heartbeat
  • slow or irregular breathing
  • sore throat
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth
  • stiff neck
  • sweating
  • swelling of the feet or lower legs
  • swollen glands
  • tightness in the chest
  • trembling
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • weight chest discomfort
  • weight loss
  • wheezing

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Incidence not known
  • Blurred or loss of vision
  • decreased appetite
  • depression
  • disturbed color perception
  • hair loss or thinning of the hair
  • halos around lights
  • hives or welts
  • increased salivation
  • night blindness
  • overbright appearance of lights
  • pain at the injection site
  • purple spots on the skin
  • redness of the skin
  • swelling or inflammation of the mouth
  • tunnel vision
  • unusual drowsiness, dullness, tiredness, weakness, or feeling of sluggishness

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Interactions

See also Warning section.

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.

Other medications that may affect the kidneys or hearing may increase the risk of kidney damage or hearing loss if taken with gentamicin. Some affected drugs include: amikacin, tobramycin, amphotericin B, cidofovir, cisplatin, polymyxin B, cephalosporins such as cephaloridine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, among others.

Although most antibiotics are unlikely to affect hormonal birth control such as pills, patch, or ring, a few antibiotics (such as rifampin, rifabutin) can decrease their effectiveness. This could result in pregnancy. If you use hormonal birth control, ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

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