Alendronate weekly-oral

Name: ALENDRONATE WEEKLY-ORAL

Precautions

Before taking alendronate, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to other bisphosphonates; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: disorders of the esophagus (such as esophageal stricture or achalasia), trouble swallowing, trouble standing or sitting upright for at least 30 minutes, low calcium levels, kidney problems, stomach/intestinal disorders (such as ulcers).Infrequently, people taking bisphosphonates have had serious jawbone problems (osteonecrosis). Poor dental hygiene, poorly fitting dentures, or having certain dental work (such as tooth removal, dental surgery) may increase your risk. Medical conditions (such as gum disease/infection, cancer, anemia) might also increase the risk. If you develop jaw pain, tell your doctor and dentist immediately.Before having any surgery (especially dental procedures), tell your doctor and dentist about this medication and all other products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). Your doctor or dentist may tell you to stop taking alendronate before your surgery. Follow all instructions about stopping or starting this medication.This drug is not recommended for use in children. Studies have shown that many children who took this drug had severe side effects such as vomiting, fever, and flu-like symptoms.Caution is advised if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant in the future. Alendronate may stay in your body for many years. Its effects on an unborn baby are unknown. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor before starting treatment with alendronate.It is unknown if this medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Drug interactions

See also How to Use section.Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.Check all prescription and nonprescription medicine labels carefully since many medications contain pain relievers/fever reducers (aspirin, NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen, celecoxib) that could cause stomach irritation/ulcers. However, if your doctor has directed you to take low-dose aspirin for heart attack or stroke prevention (usually at dosages of 81-325 milligrams a day), you should continue taking the aspirin unless your doctor instructs you otherwise. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

Missed dose

If you miss a dose, take it the next morning after you remember. Then resume taking your weekly dose on your originally scheduled day of the week. Do not take two doses on the same day.

Storage

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets.Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

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Reviewed on 4/16/2014 References
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