Akbeta

Name: Akbeta

How should this medicine be used?

Ophthalmic levobunolol comes as a solution (liquid) to instill in the eyes. Levobunolol eye drops are usually instilled once or twice a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use levobunolol eye drops exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of them or use them more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Levobunolol eye drops control glaucoma but do not cure it. Continue to use levobunolol eye drops even if you feel well. Do not stop using levobunolol eye drops without talking to your doctor.

To instill the eye drops, follow these steps:

  1. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water.
  2. Check the dropper tip to make sure that it is not chipped or cracked.
  3. Avoid touching the dropper tip against your eye or anything else; eye drops and droppers must be kept clean.
  4. While tilting your head back, pull down the lower lid of your eye with your index finger to form a pocket.
  5. Hold the dropper (tip down) with the other hand, as close to the eye as possible without touching it.
  6. Brace the remaining fingers of that hand against your face.
  7. While looking up, gently squeeze the dropper so that a single drop falls into the pocket made by the lower eyelid. Remove your index finger from the lower eyelid.
  8. Close your eye for 2 to 3 minutes and tip your head down as though looking at the floor. Try not to blink or squeeze your eyelids.
  9. Place a finger on the tear duct and apply gentle pressure.
  10. Wipe any excess liquid from your face with a tissue.
  11. If you are to use more than one drop in the same eye, wait at least 5 minutes before instilling the next drop.
  12. Replace and tighten the cap on the dropper bottle. Do not wipe or rinse the dropper tip.
  13. Wash your hands to remove any medication.

Other uses for this medicine

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Levobunolol eye drops may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • eye stinging or burning
  • discomfort, redness, or itching of the eye
  • swelling of the eyelids
  • decreased vision

Some side effects may be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop using the eye drops and call your doctor immediately:

  • difficulty breathing
  • wheezing
  • slow or irregular heartbeat
  • faintness
  • swelling of the feet and legs
  • sudden weight gain

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

What should I know about storage and disposal of this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.

It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Akbeta (levobunolol ophthalmic)?

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to levobunolol, or if you have:

  • asthma, or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD);

  • slow heartbeats; or

  • a heart condition called "AV block."

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medication:

  • breathing problems such as bronchitis or emphysema;

  • a history of heart disease or congestive heart failure;

  • diabetes;

  • history of stroke, blood clot, or circulation problems;

  • a thyroid disorder; or

  • a muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether levobunolol ophthalmic is harmful to an unborn baby. Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether levobunolol passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Adverse Effects

Frequency Not Defined

Mild ocular stinging

Ataxia

Burning

Lethargy

Discomfort

Band keratopathy

Respiratory failure

Blepharitis

Impotence

Blepharoconjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis

Decreased visual acuity

Erythema

Iridocyclitis

Itching sensation

Decreased corneal sensitivity

Tearing

Urticaria

Paresthesia

Ptosis

Cerebral ischemia

Decreased blood pressure

Hypersensitivity reactions

Heart block

Syncope

Reduction of resting heart rate

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Applies to levobunolol ophthalmic: ophthalmic solution

General

The most commonly reported side effects were ocular burning/stinging, blepharoconjunctivitis, eye irritation, and eye pain.[Ref]

Ocular

Very common (10% or more): Eye irritation, eye pain
Common (1% to 10%): Blepharitis, conjunctivitis
Rare (less than 0.1%): Iridocyclitis
Frequency not reported: Conjunctival/ocular hyperemia, allergic conjunctivitis, decreased corneal reflex, keratitis, blurred vision, punctate keratitis, eye/eyelids pruritus, eye/eyelid edema, eye discharge, increased lacrimation, dry eye, choroidal detachment following filtration surgery, corneal erosion, diplopia, ptosis, corneal calcification, decreased corneal sensitivity, blepharoptosis[Ref]

Respiratory

Frequency not reported: Asthma, dyspnea, throat irritation, nasal discomfort, bronchospasm (predominantly in patients with pre-existing bronchospastic disease), cough, respiratory failure, nasal congestion[Ref]

Cardiovascular

Frequency not reported: Raynaud's phenomenon, syncope, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, palpitations, hypotension, arrhythmia, cardiac arrest, cardiac failure, chest pain, congestive heart failure, cold hands and feet[Ref]

Hypersensitivity

Frequency not reported: Anaphylactic reaction, systemic allergic reactions including angioedema[Ref]

Nervous system

Rare (less than 0.1%): Transient ataxia
Frequency not reported: Confusion, dizziness, somnolence, lethargy, headache, memory loss, cerebral ischemia, cerebrovascular accident, increases in signs and symptoms of myasthenia gravis, paresthesia, dysgeusia[Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Frequency not reported: Nausea, abdominal pain, diarrhea, dry mouth, dyspepsia, vomiting[Ref]

Genitourinary

Frequency not reported: Decreased libido, sexual dysfunction, impotence[Ref]

Musculoskeletal

Frequency not reported: Myalgia[Ref]

Psychiatric

Frequency not reported: Depression, insomnia, nightmares[Ref]

Other

Frequency not reported: Edema, fatigue, asthenia[Ref]

Dermatologic

Frequency not reported: Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, contact dermatitis (including allergic contact dermatitis), rash, skin exfoliation, lichenoid keratosis, pruritus, erythema of eyelid, eyelid eczema, alopecia, psoriasiform rash, exacerbation of psoriasis[Ref]

Metabolic

Frequency not reported: Hypoglycemia, masked symptoms of hypoglycemia in insulin-dependent diabetics[Ref]

Some side effects of AK-Beta may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

Dialysis

Data not available

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