AgonEaze

Name: AgonEaze

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

  • AgonEaze
  • Emla

Available Dosage Forms:

  • Cream
  • Film
  • Kit

Therapeutic Class: Anesthetic Combination

Chemical Class: Amino Amide

Before Using AgonEaze

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of lidocaine and prilocaine topical cream in children. However, because of this medicine's toxicity, it should be used with caution, after other medicines have been considered or found ineffective. Recommended doses should not be exceeded, and the patient should be carefully monitored during therapy.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of lidocaine and prilocaine topical cream in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney or liver problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving lidocaine and prilocaine topical cream.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus.

Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Acecainide
  • Amiodarone
  • Bretylium
  • Dofetilide
  • Ibutilide
  • Sotalol

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, history of or
  • Heart disease or
  • Heart rhythm problems or
  • Infection at or near the place of application or
  • Large sores, broken skin, or severe injury at the area of application—May cause side effects to become worse.
  • Methemoglobinemia (blood disorder), history of—Should not use in patients with this condition.
  • Liver disease, severe—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

For the Consumer

Applies to lidocaine / prilocaine topical: topical application cream, topical application film, topical application kit

Other dosage forms:

  • gingival gel/jelly

Along with its needed effects, lidocaine / prilocaine topical may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking lidocaine / prilocaine topical:

Rare
  • Cough
  • difficulty with swallowing
  • large, hive-like swellings on the eyelids, face, lips, or tongue
  • severe dizziness or feeling faint
  • shortness of breath
  • skin rash, itching, or hives
  • stuffy nose
  • tightness in the chest
  • troubled breathing
  • wheezing
Incidence not known
  • Blisters on skin at application site
  • blue or blue-purple color of lips, fingernails, mouth, or skin
  • blurred or double vision
  • convulsions
  • dark urine
  • dizziness or drowsiness
  • fainting
  • feeling hot, cold, or numb
  • headache
  • irregular or fast heartbeat
  • muscle twitching or trembling
  • nausea or vomiting
  • ringing or buzzing in the ears
  • shortness of breath or troubled breathing
  • unusual excitement, nervousness, or restlessness
  • unusual tiredness or weakness

Some side effects of lidocaine / prilocaine topical may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common
  • Burning, swelling, itching, or skin rash at application site
  • white or red skin at the application site

Usual Adult Dose for Anesthesia

Venipuncture and intravenous cannulation: 2.5 g (one-half of 5 g tube) over 20 to 25 cm2 of skin surface for at least 1 hour.

Painful dermatologic procedure on a large skin area such as split thickness skin graft harvesting: 2 g per 10 cm2 of skin surface for at least 2 hours.

Genital skin (male): adjunct prior to local anesthetic infiltration, 1 g per 10 cm2 of skin surface for 15 minutes. Local anesthetic infiltration should be performed immediately after the removal of the cream. Dermal analgesia can be expected to increase for up to 3 hours under occlusive dressing and persist for 1 to 2 hours after removal of the cream.

Genital mucous membranes (female): 5 to 10 g for 5 to 10 minutes. Occlusion is not necessary for absorption. The procedure or the local anesthetic infiltration should be performed immediately after the removal of the cream.

Applied directly into periodontal pockets to provide localized anesthesia: Apply lidocaine-prilocaine liquid on the gingival margin around the selected teeth using the blunt tipped applicator included in the package. Wait 30 seconds, then fill the periodontal pockets with lidocaine-prilocaine liquid using the blunt tipped applicator until the gel becomes visible at the gingival margin. Wait another 30 seconds before starting treatment. A longer waiting time does not enhance the anesthesia. Anesthetic effect, as assessed by probing of pocket depths, has a duration of approximately 20 minutes. If the anesthesia starts to wear off, lidocaine-prilocaine liquid may be reapplied if needed. The maximum recommended dose of lidocaine-prilocaine liquid at one treatment session is 5 cartridges.

Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Dialysis

Data not available

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