Afluria 2017-2018 injection

Name: Afluria 2017-2018 injection

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving this vaccine?

You may not be able to receive this vaccine if you are allergic to eggs, or if you have:

  • a history of severe allergic reaction to a flu vaccine; or

  • a history of Guillain-Barre syndrome (within 6 weeks after receiving a flu vaccine).

To make sure this vaccine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia or easy bruising;

  • a neurologic disorder or disease affecting the brain (or if this was a reaction to a previous vaccine);

  • seizures;

  • a weak immune system caused by disease, bone marrow transplant, or by using certain medicines or receiving cancer treatments; or

  • if you are allergic to latex rubber.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a minor cold. If you have a severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that pregnant women get a flu shot during any trimester of pregnancy to protect themselves and their newborn babies from flu. The nasal spray form of influenza vaccine is not recommended for use in pregnant women.

It is not known whether influenza virus vaccine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not receive this vaccine without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

This vaccine should not be given to a child younger than 6 months old.

How is this vaccine given?

Some brands of this vaccine are made for use in adults and not in children. Your child's doctor can recommend the best influenza virus vaccine for your child.

This vaccine is given as an injection (shot) into a muscle. You will receive this injection in a doctor's office or other clinic setting.

You should receive a flu vaccine every year. Your immunity will gradually decrease over the 12 months after you receive the influenza virus vaccine. Children receiving this vaccine may need a booster shot one month after receiving the first vaccine.

The influenza virus vaccine is usually given in October or November. Some people may need to have their vaccines earlier or later. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may recommend treating fever and pain with an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, and others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Follow the label directions or your doctor's instructions about how much of this medicine to give your child.

It is especially important to prevent fever from occurring in a child who has a seizure disorder such as epilepsy.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of this vaccine is unlikely to occur.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Precautions

Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients younger than 6 months.

Consult WARNINGS section for additional precautions.

Dialysis

Data not available

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