Advil

Name: Advil

Uses of Advil

Ibuprofen is a prescription medicine used to treat the symptoms of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, primary dysmenorrhea (pain due to menstruation), and mild to moderate pain. It may also be used to reduce fever in adults.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Advil Food Interactions

Medicines can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of ibuprofen, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving ibuprofen.

 

Advil FDA Warning

Cardiovascular Risk:

  • NSAIDs may cause an increased risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, which can be fatal. This risk may increase with duration of use. Patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors for cardiovascular disease may be at greater risk.
  • These drugs are contraindicated for treatment of peri-operative pain in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery.

Gastrointestinal Risk:

  • NSAIDs cause an increased risk of serious gastrointestinal adverse events including bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the stomach or intestines, which can be fatal. These events can occur at any time during use and without warning symptoms. Elderly patients are at greater risk for serious gastrointestinal events.

What is the most important information I should know about ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen can increase your risk of fatal heart attack or stroke, especially if you use it long term or take high doses, or if you have heart disease. Do not use this medicine just before or after heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Ibuprofen may also cause stomach or intestinal bleeding, which can be fatal. These conditions can occur without warning while you are using ibuprofen, especially in older adults.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen can increase your risk of fatal heart attack or stroke, especially if you use it long term or take high doses, or if you have heart disease. Even people without heart disease or risk factors could have a stroke or heart attack while taking this medicine.

Do not use this medicine just before or after heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Ibuprofen may also cause stomach or intestinal bleeding, which can be fatal. These conditions can occur without warning while you are using ibuprofen, especially in older adults.

You should not use ibuprofen if you are allergic to it, or if you have ever had an asthma attack or severe allergic reaction after taking aspirin or an NSAID.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have:

  • heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or if you smoke;

  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot;

  • a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding;

  • asthma;

  • liver or kidney disease;

  • fluid retention; or

  • a connective tissue disease such as Marfan syndrome, Sjogren's syndrome, or lupus.

Taking ibuprofen during the last 3 months of pregnancy may harm the unborn baby. Do not use this medicine without a doctor's advice if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether ibuprofen passes into breast milk or if it could affect a nursing baby. Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are breast-feeding.

Do not give ibuprofen to a child younger than 2 years old without the advice of a doctor.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, drowsiness, black or bloody stools, coughing up blood, shallow breathing, fainting, or coma.

Active ingredient

Advil Tablets (in each tablet)

Ibuprofen 200 mg (NSAID)*

*nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug

Advil Caplets (in each caplet)

Ibuprofen 200 mg (NSAID)*

*nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug

Advil Gel Caps (in each gel caplet)

Ibuprofen 200 mg (NSAID)*

*nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug

Before taking this medicine

Advil can increase your risk of fatal heart attack or stroke, especially if you use it long term or take high doses, or if you have heart disease. Even people without heart disease or risk factors could have a stroke or heart attack while taking this medicine.

Do not use this medicine just before or after heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Advil may also cause stomach or intestinal bleeding, which can be fatal. These conditions can occur without warning while you are using ibuprofen, especially in older adults.

You should not use Advil if you are allergic to ibuprofen, or if you have ever had an asthma attack or severe allergic reaction after taking aspirin or an NSAID.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have:

  • heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or if you smoke;

  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot;

  • a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding;

  • asthma;

  • liver or kidney disease;

  • fluid retention; or

  • a connective tissue disease such as Marfan syndrome, Sjogren's syndrome, or lupus.

Taking Advil during the last 3 months of pregnancy may harm the unborn baby.Do not use this medicine without a doctor's advice if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether ibuprofen passes into breast milk or if it could affect a nursing baby. Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are breast-feeding.

Do not give ibuprofen to a child younger than 6 months old without the advice of a doctor.

What other drugs will affect Advil?

Ask your doctor before using Advil if you take an antidepressant such as citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline (Zoloft), trazodone, or vilazodone. Taking any of these medicines with an NSAID may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to use Advil if you are also using any of the following drugs:

  • lithium;

  • methotrexate;

  • a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven);

  • heart or blood pressure medication, including a diuretic or "water pill"; or

  • steroid medicine (such as prednisone).

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with ibuprofen, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

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