Abacavir Sulfate Tablets

Name: Abacavir Sulfate Tablets

Contraindications

Abacavir tablet is contraindicated in patients:

  • who have the HLA-B*5701 allele [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] .
  • with prior hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] .
  • with moderate or severe hepatic impairment [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6)] .

Warnings and Precautions

Hypersensitivity Reactions

Serious and sometimes fatal hypersensitivity reactions have occurred with abacavir sulfate. These hypersensitivity reactions have included multi-organ failure and anaphylaxis and typically occurred within the first 6 weeks of treatment with abacavir sulfate (median time to onset was 9 days); although abacavir hypersensitivity reactions have occurred any time during treatment [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. Patients who carry the HLA-B*5701 allele are at a higher risk of abacavir hypersensitivity reactions; although, patients who do not carry the HLA-B*5701 allele have developed hypersensitivity reactions. Hypersensitivity to abacavir was reported in approximately 206 (8%) of 2,670 patients in 9 clinical trials with abacavir-containing products where HLA-B*5701 screening was not performed. The incidence of suspected abacavir hypersensitivity reactions in clinical trials was 1% when subjects carrying the HLA-B*5701 allele were excluded. In any patient treated with abacavir, the clinical diagnosis of hypersensitivity reaction must remain the basis of clinical decision making.

Due to the potential for severe, serious, and possibly fatal hypersensitivity reactions with abacavir sulfate:

  • All patients should be screened for the HLA-B*5701 allele prior to initiating therapy with abacavir tablets or reinitiation of therapy with abacavir tablets, unless patients have a previously documented HLA-B*5701 allele assessment.
  • Abacavir tablet is contraindicated in patients with a prior hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir and in HLA-B*5701-positive patients.
  • Before starting abacavir tablets, review medical history for prior exposure to any abacavir-containing product. NEVER restart abacavir tablets or any other abacavir-containing product following a hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir, regardless of HLA-B*5701 status.
  • To reduce the risk of a life-threatening hypersensitivity reaction, regardless of HLA-B*5701 status, discontinue abacavir tablets immediately if a hypersensitivity reaction is suspected, even when other diagnoses are possible (e.g., acute onset respiratory diseases such as pneumonia, bronchitis, pharyngitis, or influenza; gastroenteritis; or reactions to other medications).
  • If a hypersensitivity reaction cannot be ruled out, do not restart abacavir tablets or any other abacavir-containing products because more severe symptoms which may include life-threatening hypotension and death, can occur within hours.
  • If a hypersensitivity reaction is ruled out, patients may restart abacavir tablets. Rarely, patients who have stopped abacavir for reasons other than symptoms of hypersensitivity have also experienced life-threatening reactions within hours of reinitiating abacavir therapy. Therefore, reintroduction of abacavir tablets or any other abacavir-containing product is recommended only if medical care can be readily accessed.
  • A Medication Guide and Warning Card that provide information about recognition of hypersensitivity reactions should be dispensed with each new prescription and refill.

Lactic Acidosis and Severe Hepatomegaly with Steatosis

Lactic acidosis and severe hepatomegaly with steatosis, including fatal cases, have been reported with the use of nucleoside analogues and other antiretrovirals. A majority of these cases have been in women. Obesity and prolonged nucleoside exposure may be risk factors. Caution should be exercised when administering abacavir tablets to any patient with known risk factors for liver disease; however, cases have also been reported in patients with no known risk factors. Treatment with abacavir tablets should be suspended in any patient who develops clinical or laboratory findings suggestive of lactic acidosis or pronounced hepatotoxicity (which may include hepatomegaly and steatosis even in the absence of marked transaminase elevations).

Immune Reconstitution Syndrome

Immune reconstitution syndrome has been reported in patients treated with combination antiretroviral therapy, including abacavir sulfate. During the initial phase of combination antiretroviral treatment, patients whose immune systems respond may develop an inflammatory response to indolent or residual opportunistic infections (such as Mycobacterium avium infection, cytomegalovirus, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia [PCP], or tuberculosis), which may necessitate further evaluation and treatment.

Autoimmune disorders (such as Graves' disease, polymyositis, and Guillain-Barre syndrome) have also been reported to occur in the setting of immune reconstitution; however, the time to onset is more variable and can occur many months after initiation of treatment.

Fat Redistribution

Redistribution/accumulation of body fat including central obesity, dorsocervical fat enlargement (buffalo hump), peripheral wasting, facial wasting, breast enlargement, and "cushingoid appearance" have been observed in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. The mechanism and long-term consequences of these events are currently unknown. A causal relationship has not been established.

Myocardial Infarction

In a published prospective, observational, epidemiological trial designed to investigate the rate of myocardial infarction (MI) in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy, the use of abacavir within the previous 6 months was correlated with an increased risk of MI. In a sponsor-conducted pooled analysis of clinical trials, no excess risk of MI was observed in abacavir-treated subjects as compared with control subjects. In totality, the available data from the observational cohort and from clinical trials are inconclusive.

As a precaution, the underlying risk of coronary heart disease should be considered when prescribing antiretroviral therapies, including abacavir, and action taken to minimize all modifiable risk factors (e.g., hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking).

Use in specific populations

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Exposure Registry

There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to abacavir sulfate during pregnancy. Healthcare Providers are encouraged to register patients by calling the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry (APR) at 1-800-258-4263.

Risk Summary

Available data from the APR show no difference in the overall risk of birth defects for abacavir compared with the background rate for birth defects of 2.7% in the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP) reference population [see Data]. The APR uses the MACDP as the U.S. reference population for birth defects in the general population. The MACDP evaluates women and infants from a limited geographic area and does not include outcomes for births that occurred at less than 20 weeks gestation. The rate of miscarriage is not reported in the APR. The estimated background rate of miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies in the U.S. general population is 15% to 20%. The background risk for major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown.

In animal reproduction studies, oral administration of abacavir to pregnant rats during organogenesis resulted in fetal malformations and other embryonic and fetal toxicities at exposures 35 times the human exposure (AUC) at the recommended clinical daily dose. However, no adverse developmental effects were observed following oral administration of abacavir to pregnant rabbits during organogenesis, at exposures approximately 9 times the human exposure (AUC) at the recommended clinical dose [see Data].

Data

Human Data: Based on prospective reports to the APR of over 2,000 exposures to abacavir during pregnancy resulting in live births (including over 1,000 exposed in the first trimester), there was no difference between the overall risk of birth defects for abacavir compared with the background birth defect rate of 2.7% in the U.S. reference population of the MACDP. The prevalence of defects in live births was 2.9% (95% CI: 2.0% to 4.1%) following first trimester exposure to abacavir-containing regimens and 2.7% (95% CI: 1.9% to 3.7%) following second/third trimester exposure to abacavir-containing regimens.

Abacavir has been shown to cross the placenta and concentrations in neonatal plasma at birth were essentially equal to those in maternal plasma at delivery [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Animal Data: Abacavir was administered orally to pregnant rats (at 100, 300, and 1,000 mg per kg per day) and rabbits (at 125, 350, or 700 mg per kg per day) during organogenesis (on gestation Days 6 through 17 and 6 through 20, respectively). Fetal malformations (increased incidences of fetal anasarca and skeletal malformations) or developmental toxicity (decreased fetal body weight and crown-rump length) were observed in rats at doses up to 1,000 mg per kg per day, resulting in exposures approximately 35 times the human exposure (AUC) at the recommended daily dose. No developmental effects were observed in rats at 100 mg per kg per day, resulting in exposures (AUC) 3.5 times the human exposure at the recommended daily dose. In a fertility and early embryo-fetal development study conducted in rats (at 60, 160, or 500 mg per kg per day), embryonic and fetal toxicities (increased resorptions, decreased fetal body weights) or toxicities to the offspring (increased incidence of stillbirth and lower body weights) occurred at doses up to 500 mg per kg per day. No developmental effects were observed in rats at 60 mg per kg per day, resulting in exposures (AUC) approximately 4 times the human exposure at the recommended daily dose. Studies in pregnant rats showed that abacavir is transferred to the fetus through the placenta. In pregnant rabbits, no developmental toxicities and no increases in fetal malformations occurred at up to the highest dose evaluated, resulting in exposures (AUC) approximately 9 times the human exposure at the recommended dose.

Lactation

Risk Summary

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that HIV-1-infected mothers in the United States not breastfeed their infants to avoid risking postnatal transmission of HIV-1 infection. Abacavir is present in human milk. There is no information on the effects of abacavir on the breastfed infant or the effects of the drug on milk production. Because of the potential for (1) HIV-1 transmission (in HIV-negative infants), (2) developing viral resistance (in HIV-positive infants), and (3) serious adverse reactions in a breastfed infant, instruct mothers not to breastfeed if they are receiving abacavir tablets.

Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of abacavir sulfate have been established in pediatric patients aged 3 months and older. Use of abacavir sulfate is supported by pharmacokinetic trials and evidence from adequate and well-controlled trials of abacavir sulfate in adults and pediatric subjects [see Dosage and Administration (2.2), Adverse Reactions (6.2), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), Clinical Studies (14.2)].

Geriatric Use

Clinical trials of abacavir sulfate did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. In general, caution should be exercised in the administration of abacavir sulfate in elderly patients reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

Patients with Impaired Hepatic Function

A dose reduction is required for patients with mild hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class A) [see Dosage and Administration (2.4)]. The safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetic properties of abacavir have not been established in patients with moderate or severe hepatic impairment; therefore, abacavir sulfate is contraindicated in these patients [see Contraindications (4), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Nonclinical Toxicology

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Carcinogenicity

Abacavir was administered orally at 3 dosage levels to separate groups of mice and rats in 2-year carcinogenicity studies. Results showed an increase in the incidence of malignant and non-malignant tumors. Malignant tumors occurred in the preputial gland of males and the clitoral gland of females of both species, and in the liver of female rats. In addition, non-malignant tumors also occurred in the liver and thyroid gland of female rats. These observations were made at systemic exposures in the range of 6 to 32 times the human exposure at the recommended dose of 600 mg.

Mutagenicity

Abacavir induced chromosomal aberrations both in the presence and absence of metabolic activation in an in vitro cytogenetic study in human lymphocytes. Abacavir was mutagenic in the absence of metabolic activation, although it was not mutagenic in the presence of metabolic activation in an L5178Y mouse lymphoma assay. Abacavir was clastogenic in males and not clastogenic in females in an in vivo mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay.

Abacavir was not mutagenic in bacterial mutagenicity assays in the presence and absence of metabolic activation.

Impairment of Fertility

Abacavir did not affect male or female fertility in rats at a dose associated with exposures (AUC) approximately 3.3 times (male) or 4.1 times (female) those in humans at the clinically recommended dose.

Animal Toxicology and/or Pharmacology

Myocardial degeneration was found in mice and rats following administration of abacavir for 2 years. The systemic exposures were equivalent to 7 to 24 times the expected systemic exposure in humans at a dose of 600 mg. The clinical relevance of this finding has not been determined.

Clinical Studies

Adult Trials

Therapy-Naive Adults

CNA30024 was a multicenter, double-blind, controlled trial in which 649 HIV-1-infected, therapy-naive adults were randomized and received either abacavir sulfate (300 mg twice daily), lamivudine (150 mg twice daily), and efavirenz (600 mg once daily); or zidovudine (300 mg twice daily), lamivudine (150 mg twice daily), and efavirenz (600 mg once daily). The duration of double-blind treatment was at least 48 weeks. Trial participants were male (81%), white (51%), black (21%), and Hispanic (26%). The median age was 35 years; the median pretreatment CD4+ cell count was 264 cells per mm3, and median plasma HIV-1 RNA was 4.79 log10 copies per mL. The outcomes of randomized treatment are provided in Table 7.

Table 7. Outcomes of Randomized Treatment through Week 48 (CNA30024)
* Subjects achieved and maintained confirmed HIV-1 RNA less than or equal to 50 copies per mL (less than 400 copies per mL) through Week 48 (Roche AMPLICOR Ultrasensitive HIV-1 MONITOR standard test 1.0 PCR). † Includes viral rebound, insufficient viral response according to the investigator, and failure to achieve confirmed less than or equal to 50 copies per mL by Week 48. ‡ Includes consent withdrawn, lost to follow up, protocol violations, those with missing data, clinical progression, and other.
Outcome
Abacavir sulfate plus Lamivudine plus Efavirenz
(n = 324)
Zidovudine plus Lamivudine plus Efavirenz
(n = 325)
Responder*
69% (73%)
69% (71%)
Virologic failures†
6%
4%
Discontinued due to adverse reactions
14%
16%
Discontinued due to other reasons‡
10%
11%

After 48 weeks of therapy, the median CD4+ cell count increases from baseline were 209 cells per mm3 in the group receiving abacavir sulfate and 155 cells per mm3 in the zidovudine group. Through Week 48, 8 subjects (2%) in the group receiving abacavir sulfate (5 CDC classification C events and 3 deaths) and 5 subjects (2%) on the zidovudine arm (3 CDC classification C events and 2 deaths) experienced clinical disease progression.

CNA3005 was a multicenter, double-blind, controlled trial in which 562 HIV-1-infected, therapy-naive adults were randomized to receive either abacavir sulfate (300 mg twice daily) plus COMBIVIR® (lamivudine 150 mg/zidovudine 300 mg twice daily), or indinavir (800 mg 3 times a day) plus COMBIVIR twice daily. The trial was stratified at randomization by pre-entry plasma HIV-1 RNA 10,000 to 100,000 copies per mL and plasma HIV-1 RNA greater than 100,000 copies per mL. Trial participants were male (87%), white (73%), black (15%), and Hispanic (9%). At baseline the median age was 36 years; the median baseline CD4+ cell count was 360 cells per mm3, and median baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA was 4.8 log10 copies per mL. Proportions of subjects with plasma HIV-1 RNA less than 400 copies per mL (using Roche AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR test) through 48 weeks of treatment are summarized in Table 8.

Table 8. Outcomes of Randomized Treatment through Week 48 (CNA3005)
* Subjects achieved and maintained confirmed HIV-1 RNA less than 400 copies per mL. † Includes viral rebound and failure to achieve confirmed less than 400 copies per mL by Week 48. ‡ Includes consent withdrawn, lost to follow up, protocol violations, those with missing data, clinical progression, and other.
Outcome
Abacavir sulfate plus Lamivudine/Zidovudine
(n = 262)
Indinavir plus Lamivudine/Zidovudine
(n = 265)
Responder*
49%
50%
Virologic failures†
31%
28%
Discontinued due to adverse reactions
10%
12%
Discontinued due to other reasons‡
11%
10%

Treatment response by plasma HIV-1 RNA strata is shown in Table 9.

Table 9. Proportions of Responders through Week 48 by Screening Plasma HIV-1 RNA Levels (CNA3005)
Screening HIV-1 RNA
 (copies/mL)
Abacavir sulfate plus Lamivudine/Zidovudine
(n = 262)
Indinavir plus Lamivudine/Zidovudine
(n = 265)
<400 copies/mL
n
<400 copies/mL
n
≥10,000 - ≤100,000
50%
166
48%
165
>100,000
48%
96
52%
100

In subjects with baseline viral load greater than 100,000 copies per mL, percentages of subjects with HIV-1 RNA levels less than 50 copies per mL were 31% in the group receiving abacavir versus 45% in the group receiving indinavir.

Through Week 48, an overall mean increase in CD4+ cell count of about 150 cells per mm3 was observed in both treatment arms. Through Week 48, 9 subjects (3.4%) in the group receiving abacavir (6 CDC classification C events and 3 deaths) and 3 subjects (1.5%) in the group receiving indinavir (2 CDC classification C events and 1 death) experienced clinical disease progression.

CNA30021 was an international, multicenter, double-blind, controlled trial in which 770 HIV-1-infected, therapy-naive adults were randomized and received either abacavir 600 mg once daily or abacavir 300 mg twice daily, both in combination with lamivudine 300 mg once daily and efavirenz 600 mg once daily. The double-blind treatment duration was at least 48 weeks. Trial participants had a mean age of 37 years; were: male (81%), white (54%), black (27%), and American Hispanic (15%). The median baseline CD4+ cell count was 262 cells per mm3 (range: 21 to 918 cells per mm3) and the median baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA was 4.89 log10 copies per mL (range: 2.60 to 6.99 log10 copies per mL).

The outcomes of randomized treatment are provided in Table 10.

Table 10. Outcomes of Randomized Treatment through Week 48 (CNA30021)
* Subjects achieved and maintained confirmed HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies per mL (less than 400 copies per mL) through Week 48 (Roche AMPLICOR Ultrasensitive HIV-1 MONITOR standard test version 1.0). † Includes viral rebound, failure to achieve confirmed less than 50 copies per mL (less than 400 copies per mL) by Week 48, and insufficient viral load response. ‡ Includes consent withdrawn, lost to follow up, protocol violations, clinical progression, and other.
Outcome
Abacavir sulfate 600 mg q.d. plus EPIVIR® plus Efavirenz
(n = 384)
Abacavir sulfate 300 mg b.i.d. plus EPIVIR® plus Efavirenz
(n = 386)
Responder*
64% (71%)
65% (72%)
Virologic failure†
11% (5%)
11% (5%)
Discontinued due to adverse reactions
13%
11%
Discontinued due to other reasons‡
11%
13%

After 48 weeks of therapy, the median CD4+ cell count increases from baseline were 188 cells per mm3 in the group receiving abacavir 600 mg once daily and 200 cells per mm3 in the group receiving abacavir 300 mg twice daily. Through Week 48, 6 subjects (2%) in the group receiving abacavir sulfate 600 mg once daily (4 CDC classification C events and 2 deaths) and 10 subjects (3%) in the group receiving abacavir sulfate 300 mg twice daily (7 CDC classification C events and 3 deaths) experienced clinical disease progression. None of the deaths were attributed to trial medications.

Pediatric Trials

Therapy-Experienced Pediatric Subjects

CNA3006 was a randomized, double-blind trial comparing abacavir sulfate 8 mg per kg twice daily plus lamivudine 4 mg per kg twice daily plus zidovudine 180 mg per m2 twice daily versus lamivudine 4 mg per kg twice daily plus zidovudine 180 mg per m2 twice daily. Two hundred and five therapy-experienced pediatric subjects were enrolled: female (56%), white (17%), black (50%), Hispanic (30%), median age of 5.4 years, baseline CD4+ cell percent greater than 15% (median = 27%), and median baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA of 4.6 log10 copies per mL. Eighty percent and 55% of subjects had prior therapy with zidovudine and lamivudine, respectively, most often in combination. The median duration of prior nucleoside analogue therapy was 2 years. At 16 weeks the proportion of subjects responding based on plasma HIV-1 RNA less than or equal to 400 copies per mL was significantly higher in subjects receiving abacavir sulfate plus lamivudine plus zidovudine compared with subjects receiving lamivudine plus zidovudine, 13% versus 2%, respectively. Median plasma HIV-1 RNA changes from baseline were -0.53 log10 copies per mL in the group receiving abacavir sulfate plus lamivudine plus zidovudine compared with -0.21 log10 copies per mL in the group receiving lamivudine plus zidovudine. Median CD4+ cell count increases from baseline were 69 cells per mm3 in the group receiving abacavir sulfate plus lamivudine plus zidovudine and 9 cells per mm3 in the group receiving lamivudine plus zidovudine.

Additional pediatric use information for patients aged 3 months and above is approved for ViiV Healthcare Company's ZIAGEN® (abacavir sulfate) tablets and oral solution. However, due to ViiV Healthcare Company's marketing exclusivity rights, this drug product is not labeled with that pediatric information.

Patient Counseling Information

Advise the patient to read the FDA-approved patient labeling (Medication Guide).

Hypersensitivity Reactions

Inform patients:

  • that a Medication Guide and Warning Card summarizing the symptoms of the abacavir hypersensitivity reaction and other product information will be dispensed by the pharmacist with each new prescription and refill of abacavir tablets, and instruct the patient to read the Medication Guide and Warning Card every time to obtain any new information that may be present about abacavir sulfate. The complete text of the Medication Guide is reprinted at the end of this document.
  • to carry the Warning Card with them.
  • how to identify a hypersensitivity reaction [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1), Medication Guide] .
  • that if they develop symptoms consistent with a hypersensitivity reaction they should call their healthcare provider right away to determine if they should stop taking abacavir tablets.
  • that a hypersensitivity reaction can worsen and lead to hospitalization or death if abacavir sulfate is not immediately discontinued.
  • to not restart abacavir tablets or any other abacavir-containing product following a hypersensitivity reaction because more severe symptoms can occur within hours and may include life-threatening hypotension and death.
  • that if they have a hypersensitivity reaction, they should dispose of any unused abacavir tablets to avoid restarting abacavir.
  • that a hypersensitivity reaction is usually reversible if it is detected promptly and abacavir tablet is stopped right away.
  • that if they have interrupted abacavir tablets for reasons other than symptoms of hypersensitivity (for example, those who have an interruption in drug supply), a serious or fatal hypersensitivity reaction may occur with reintroduction of abacavir.
  • to not restart abacavir tablets or any other abacavir-containing product without medical consultation and only if medical care can be readily accessed by the patient or others.

Lactic Acidosis/Hepatomegaly with Steatosis

Advise patients that lactic acidosis and severe hepatomegaly with steatosis have been reported with use of nucleoside analogues and other antiretrovirals. Advise patients to stop taking abacavir tablets if they develop clinical symptoms suggestive of lactic acidosis or pronounced hepatotoxicity [see Boxed Warning, Warnings and Precautions (5.2)].

Immune Reconstitution Syndrome

Advise patients to inform their healthcare provider immediately of any signs and symptoms of infection as inflammation from previous infection may occur soon after combination antiretroviral therapy, including when abacavir tablet is started [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)].

Redistribution/Accumulation of Body Fat

Inform patients that redistribution or accumulation of body fat may occur in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy and that the cause and long-term health effects of these conditions are not known at this time [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)].

Pregnancy Registry

Advise patients that there is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to abacavir sulfate during pregnancy [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1)].

Lactation

Instruct women with HIV-1 infection not to breastfeed because HIV-1 can be passed to the baby in the breast milk [see Use in Specific Populations (8.2)].

Missed Dose

Instruct patients that if they miss a dose of abacavir tablets, to take it as soon as they remember. Advise patients not to double their next dose or take more than the prescribed dose [see Dosage and Administration (2)].

Availability of Medication Guide

Instruct patients to read the Medication Guide before starting abacavir sulfate and to re-read it each time the prescription is renewed. Instruct patients to inform their physician or pharmacist if they develop any unusual symptom, or if any known symptom persists or worsens.

Disclaimer: Other brands listed are the registered trademarks of their respective owners and are not trademarks of Cipla Limited.

Revised: May 2017

Manufactured by

Cipla Limited

MIDC, Patalganga

M.S. 410220, INDIA

Manufactured for: Cipla USA, Inc.

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MEDICATION GUIDE

Abacavir (a-BAK-a-vir) Tablets USP 300 mg

What is the most important information I should know about abacavir tablets?

Abacavir tablets can cause serious side effects, including:

  Serious allergic reactions (hypersensitivity reaction) that can cause death have happened with abacavir tablet and other abacavir-containing products. Your risk of this allergic reaction is much higher if you have a gene variation called HLA-B*5701. Your healthcare provider can determine with a blood test if you have this gene variation.

If you get a symptom from 2 or more of the following groups while taking abacavir tablets, call your healthcare provider right away to find out if you should stop taking abacavir tablets.


Symptom(s)
Group 1
Fever
Group 2
Rash
Group 3
Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal (stomach area) pain
Group 4
Generally ill feeling, extreme tiredness, or achiness
Group 5
Shortness of breath, cough, sore throat

A list of these symptoms is on the Warning Card your pharmacist gives you. Carry this Warning Card with you at all times.

If you stop abacavir tablets because of an allergic reaction, never take abacavir tablets or any other abacavir-containing medicine (EPZICOM®, TRIUMEQ®, or TRIZIVIR®) again.

  •   If you have an allergic reaction, dispose of any unused abacavir tablets. Ask your pharmacist how to properly dispose of medicines.
  •   If you take abacavir tablets or any other abacavir-containing medicine again after you have had an allergic reaction, within hours you may get life-threatening symptoms that may include very low blood pressure or death.
  •   If you stop abacavir tablets for any other reason, even for a few days, and you are not allergic to abacavir tablets, talk with your healthcare provider before taking it again. Taking abacavir tablets again can cause a serious allergic or life-threatening reaction, even if you never had an allergic reaction to it before.

If your healthcare provider tells you that you can take abacavir tablets again, start taking it when you are around medical help or people who can call a healthcare provider if you need one.

  • Build-up of acid in your blood (lactic acidosis). Lactic acidosis can happen in some people who take abacavir tablets. Lactic acidosis is a serious medical emergency that can cause death. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following symptoms that could be signs of lactic acidosis:
  • feel very weak or tired
  • unusual (not normal) muscle pain
  • trouble breathing
  • stomach pain with nausea and vomiting
  • feel cold, especially in your arms and legs
  • feel dizzy or light-headed
  • have a fast or irregular heartbeat

  Serious liver problems can happen in people who take abacavir tablets. In some cases, these serious liver problems can lead to death. Your liver may become large (hepatomegaly) and you may develop fat in your liver (steatosis) when you take abacavir tablets. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following signs of liver problems:

  • your skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow (jaundice)
  • dark or "tea-colored" urine
  • light-colored stools (bowel movements)
  • loss of appetite for several days or longer
  • nausea
  • pain, aching, or tenderness on the right side of your stomach area

You may be more likely to get lactic acidosis or serious liver problems if you are female, very overweight (obese), or have been taking nucleoside analogue medicines for a long time.

What is abacavir tablets?

Abacavir tablet is a prescription HIV-1 (Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1) medicine used with other antiretroviral medicines to treat HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 is the virus that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

The safety and effectiveness of abacavir sulfate has not been established in children under 3 months of age.

When used with other antiretroviral medicines to treat HIV-1 infection, abacavir tablets may help:

  • reduce the amount of HIV-1 in your blood. This is called "viral load".
  • increase the number of CD4+ (T) cells in your blood, that help fight off other infections.

Reducing the amount of HIV-1 and increasing the CD4+ (T) cells in your blood may help improve your immune system. This may reduce your risk of death or getting infections that can happen when your immune system is weak (opportunistic infections).

Abacavir tablets does not cure HIV-1 infection or AIDS. You must keep taking HIV-1 medicines to control HIV-1 infection and decrease HIV-related illnesses.

Ask your healthcare provider if you have any questions about how to prevent passing HIV to other people.

Who should not take abacavir tablets?

Do not take abacavir tablets if you:

  • have a certain type of gene variation called the HLA-B*5701 allele. Your healthcare provider will test you for this before prescribing treatment with abacavir tablets.
  • are allergic to abacavir or any of the ingredients in abacavir tablets. See the end of this Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in abacavir tablets.
  • have liver problems.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking abacavir tablets?

Before you take abacavir tablets, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • have been tested and know whether or not you have a particular gene variation called HLA-B*5701.
  • have or have had liver problems, including hepatitis B or C virus infection.
  • have heart problems, smoke, or have diseases that increase your risk of heart disease such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or diabetes.
  • drink alcohol or take medicines that contain alcohol.
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Talk to your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.
  • Pregnancy Registry. There is a pregnancy registry for women who take antiretroviral medicines during pregnancy. The purpose of this registry is to collect information about the health of you and your baby. Talk to your healthcare provider about how you can take part in this registry.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.Do not breastfeed if you take abacavir tablets.
  • You should not breastfeed if you have HIV-1 because of the risk of passing HIV-1 to your baby.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Some medicines interact with abacavir tablets. Keep a list of your medicines to show your healthcare provider and pharmacist. You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for a list of medicines that interact with abacavir tablets. Do not start taking a new medicine without telling your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider can tell you if it is safe to take abacavir tablets with other medicines.

Tell your healthcare provider if you take:

  • any other medicine to treat HIV-1
  • methadone

How should I take abacavir tablets?

  • Take abacavir tablets exactly as your healthcare provider tells you.
  • Do not change your dose or stop taking abacavir tablets without talking with your healthcare provider. If you miss a dose of abacavir tablets, take it as soon as you remember. Do not take 2 doses at the same time. If you are not sure about your dosing, call your healthcare provider.
  • Stay under the care of a healthcare provider while taking abacavir tablets.
  • Abacavir tablets may be taken with or without food.
  • For children aged 3 months and older, your healthcare provider will prescribe a dose of abacavir sulfate based on your child's body weight.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you or your child has trouble swallowing tablets.
  • Do not run out of abacavir tablets. The virus in your blood may increase and the virus may become harder to treat. When your supply starts to run out, get more from your healthcare provider or pharmacy.
  • If you take too much abacavir tablets, call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away.

What are the possible side effects of abacavir tablets?

  • Abacavir tablets can cause serious side effects including:
  • See "What is the most important information I should know about abacavir tablets?"
  • Changes in your immune system (Immune Reconstitution Syndrome) can happen when you start taking HIV-1 medicines. Your immune system may get stronger and begin to fight infections that have been hidden in your body for a long time. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you start having new symptoms after you start taking abacavir tablets.
  • Changes in body fat can happen in people who take HIV-1 medicines. These changes may include an increased amount of fat in the upper back and neck ("buffalo hump"), breast, and around the middle of your body (trunk). Loss of fat from the legs, arms, and face may also happen. The exact cause and long-term health effects of these conditions are not known.
  • Heart attack (myocardial infarction). Some HIV-1 medicines including abacavir sulfate may increase your risk of heart attack.

The most common side effects of abacavir sulfate in adults include:

  • nausea
  • headache
  • generally not feeling well
  • tiredness
  • vomiting
  • bad dreams or sleep problems

The most common side effects of abacavir sulfate in children include:

  • fever and chills
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • rash
  • ear, nose, or throat infections

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

These are not all the possible side effects of abacavir tablets. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

How should I store abacavir tablets?

  • Store abacavir tablets USP 300 mg at room temperature, between 68°F to 77°F (20°C-25°C).
  • Do not freeze abacavir sulfate.

Keep abacavir tablets and all medicines out of the reach of children.

General information for safe and effective use of abacavir tablets

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Medication Guide. Do not use abacavir tablets for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give abacavir tablets to other people, even if they have the same symptoms that you have. It may harm them.

If you would like more information, talk with your healthcare provider. You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for the information about abacavir tablets that is written for health professionals.

For more information go to www.cipla.com or call Cipla at 1-866-604-3268.

What are the ingredients in abacavir tablets?

Active ingredient: abacavir

Inactive ingredients:

Tablets:

microcrystalline cellulose, sodium starch glycolate, corn starch, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, colloidal silicon dioxide and opadry yellow 15C52843 (consist of hypromellose, titanium dioxide, polyethylene glycol, iron oxide yellow, polysorbate 80).

Disclaimer: Other brands listed are the registered trademarks of their respective owners and are not trademarks of Cipla Limited.

This Medication Guide has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.

Revised: April 2017

Manufactured by

Cipla Limited

MIDC, Patalganga

M.S. 410220, INDIA

Manufactured for: Cipla USA, Inc.

1560 Sawgrass Corporate Parkway,

Suite 130 Sunrise, FL 33323

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